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 Lamborghini Needs No Introduction

 

Lamborghini Aventador SVJ

The Aventador SVJ is the first production V12 Lamborghini model to feature Lamborghini's Aerodynamica Lamborghini Attiva (ALA) system. This allows the car to achieve 40% more downforce than the Aventador SV and 1% reduction in the coefficient of drag. The system adds aerodynamic components to the car including a disconnected front splitter, tri-dimensional air outlet on the bonnet, a large carbon fibre rear wing with a central fin, underbody aero design with vortex generators, and a large rear diffuser. The system works in conjunction with Lamborghini Dinamica Veicolo Attiva 2.0 (LDVA 2.0) management system, which uses inertial sensors to control the car's aero in 500 milliseconds.

The Aventador SVJ "63 Edition", a special edition commemorating the company's year of foundation (1963), featuring a special white livery with the number 63 more prominent on the car would be first offered for sale which limited to just 63 units while the whole production run of the Aventador SVJ would be limited to just 963 units in total including the 63 units, with deliveries starting in the beginning of 2019.

 

 Lamborghini Urus

The Lamborghini Urus is much lighter than most of its competitors (i.e the BMW X6M, Bentley Bentayga and Rolls-Royce Cullinan, but not the Porsche Cayenne) at less than 2,200 kg (4,850 lb) as quoted by the manufacturer mainly because of the extensive usage of carbon fibre reinforced polymer, although it is based on the same platform as the Audi Q7, Bentley Bentayga, Porsche Cayenne, and Volkswagen Touareg. The engine is rated at a maximum power output of 478 kW (641 hp; 650 PS) at 6,000 rpm and maximum torque of 850 N⋅m (627 lb⋅ft) at 2,250–4,500 rpm. The Urus has a front-engine, all-wheel-drive layout,and a top speed of 305 km/h (190 mph) making it one of the world's fastest production SUVs. The Urus can accelerate from 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.6 seconds and 0–200 km/h (124 mph) in 12.8 seconds. Lamborghini has developed the world's largest set of carbon ceramic disc brakes for the Urus, with 440 mm (17.32 in) discs in the front and 370 mm (14.57 in) discs in the rear using ten-piston calipers at the front and single-piston calipers at the rear. The all-wheel drive system of the Urus under normal driving sends 40 percent of the engine's torque to the front wheels and 60 percent to the rear wheels.It also uses torque vectoring to send as much as 70 percent to the front or 87 percent to the rear when necessary. The SUV also features rear-wheel steering and an air suspension system that can provide a maximum of 250 mm (9.8 in) of ground clearance for off-road use. The SUV will be available with an optional off-road package, which includes modified front and rear bumpers that are better suited to the task. The Urus, like all of Lamborghini's current offerings, will feature a selection of driving modes, which adapt the suspension to improve the car's performance in various driving conditions. The Lamborghini Urus will feature Strada (street), Sport, Corsa (track), Terra (dirt), Sabbia (sand), and Neve (snow) driving modes, with the latter three possibly only available on the off-road package offered. The Urus will have a seating capacity of four to five people.

 

 

 

 Lamborghini Huracan

 Unveiled at the 2016 Geneva Motor Show, the Huracán LP 580-2 is a lower cost derivative of the Huracán LP 610-4 that differs mostly in having the 5.2 L V10 engine detuned to 427 kW (572 hp; 580 PS) and 533 N⋅m (393 lb⋅ft) of torque along with having a rear wheel drive drivetrain instead of the all-wheel drive drivetrain found in the standard Huracán. Lamborghini claims the car will accelerate from 0–100 km/h (0–62 mph) in 3.4 seconds and 0–200 km/h (0–124 mph) in 10.1 seconds. The top speed is claimed to be as high as 320 km/h (199 mph). It also features slight visual differences to the standard variant of the car - with a different front fascia and larger air vents at the rear of the car for improved brake cooling. The seven-speed dual-clutch transmission is the same as used in the standard LP 610-4. The base level LP 580-2 costs US$201,100 (RM2.1M Inc tax), about US$40,000 less than the base level LP 610-4.

 

 Lamborghini Diablo GT

After campaigning the Diablo SV-R for four years in the Diablo Supertrophy, Lamborghini launched a completely new car for the 2000 season. Just as the SV-R was a race-ready SV, the Diablo GTR, introduced at the 1999 Bologna Motor Show, converted the Diablo GT to a track oriented car with power improvements, a stripped interior, and weight reduction.

The GTR interior was stripped down to save weight; the air conditioning, stereo, and sound and heatproofing were removed, and a single racing seat with 6-point seatbelt harness, MOMO fire suppression system and steering wheel, complete integrated roll cage, fixed Plexiglass windows with sliding sections, and fresh air intake were fitted.

The GT had already featured a radically styled body, but the GTR took this a little further with features such as a very large rear spoiler bolted directly to the chassis like a true race car, 18 inch hollow magnesium Speedline centerlock wheels, pneumatic air jacks for raising the car in the pit lane (like the SV-R, it was too low for a rolling jack), and an emergency fuel shutoff switch on the left front fender.

The GTR utilized the same basic 6.0-litre V12 engine that had made its debut on the street-legal GT, but with revised fuel and ignition systems, individual throttle bodies, a dynamic air intake duct system, variable valve timing, titanium connecting rods, and a lightened crankshaft. These improvements allowed the engine to have a power output of 598 PS (440 kW; 590 hp) and 640 N⋅m (472 lb⋅ft) of torque. The engine was bolted to the usual 5-speed transmission in a rear-wheel drive layout. Extra heat exhangers were added for the differential and transmission oil to prevent overheating under extreme racing conditions. A fast-filling racing fuel cell replaced the standard gasoline tank. The suspension was stiffened and lowered, and racing brake calipers were installed.

Thirty cars were initially planned to be produced but actual production amounted to 40 units, and 40 chassis were prepared to replace cars wrecked in racing accidents.